Wuts In Your Guts? The Microbiome

Hello folks, Dr. Michael Breen here with the Healthy Transformations program and you’re on healthytransformations.ca. Just wanted to spend a couple minutes talking to you about truly one of the most fascinating areas of contemporary science that we’re dealing with and that is the topic of the microbiome. Microbiome refers to the constellation of microorganisms that exist in and on our body but particularly microbiome makes reference to the microorganisms that exist in our gastrointestinal tract. Volume is a very interesting thing to consider. It’s estimated that a human body has about 10 trillion cells. That’s a lot of cells that make up the human body, and yet the number of microorganisms, depending on which research and who you listen to, the microbiome may in fact have 100 trillion microorganisms. So there’s 10 times as many bugs or critters on us or in us as there is human cells. So the really forward-thing science editorial people are saying, who’s in charge here? What is actually driving health? What’s driving disease? What’s controlling our physiology? It may be in fact that the microorganisms have more to do with this than what we’ve ever thought possible.

One of the other things that’s really interesting to me is that many of these organisms, bacteria, have DNA and the DNA that they have represents 99% of the total genetic influence that exists in our bodies. So we used to think that our genes determined our outcome. We know now that that’s not true but it might actually even be that it’s the genes of the bugs that are determining our outcome. Bottom line is this. Having a healthy microbiome is fundamentally important to having optimal health. If you’re not doing the things that are required to optimize your microbiome, then you can’t be possibly as healthy as you may want to be. What are those things, what do you do? Well, the whole model of taking probiotics has been one of them. That’s the consumption of these bugs and that’s been around for a long time but it certainly is gaining steam. I can tell you this, that the bugs that are in your gut and in mine eat the food that we eat. So what goes between my lips and goes down, the bugs get first dibs at it and if the food that I’m eating is lousy food, then the bugs are gonna produce lousy outcomes and if the food that I eat is really good, then the microbiome will take that good food and turn it into all kinds of remarkable chemicals that actually lead to terrifically good health outcomes. So the Healthy Transformations program actually addresses this as part of the dietary modeling that we use. If you’d like to learn more about the Healthy Transformations program, go to the website and try to attend one of our workshops. We have a few more to go in December, in January. Our class fills up really rapidly but we’d love to have you join us and learn more about how a healthy microbiome can drive health in you and your family.

Phyto What? That’s Right, Phytonutrients.

Hello, folks, Dr. Michael Breen here with healthytransformations.ca. The Healthy Transformations program is run by myself and Christopher Lawrence. If you’re having issues related to your health, overweightness, obesity, and really are looking for change, the Healthy Transformations is really the program that will help you get past these issues. I wanna take a couple minutes and talk about a concept called phytonutrition. Phyto, P-H-Y-T-O. And it means plant, is really what it boils down to. One thing that’s been consistent in nutritional science for at least three decades, it’s probably more like four or five decades, is that plant-based diets have consistently demonstrated themselves to be those that lead to better health outcomes. Now, plant-based doesn’t necessarily mean vegetarian. It means that a predominance off the volume of the food that you’re getting is actually coming from plant sources.

Now, what’s interesting about this is that science that has developed since the year 2000, maybe 2005, has in fact identified why this may be the case. And it boils down to these chemicals that are generally very, very broad classification, but called phytonutrients. So nutritional-based chemicals that come from plant sources. What’s been identified, Dr. Jeffrey Bland, who is the leader of the Personalized Lifestyle Medicine Institute and one of the very, very top researchers in the field of functional medicine, was involved in this research back in the early 2000s, and in fact stated that in his career, this was probably the single most important scientific discovery that he had been involved with. And that was the identification of this, that these chemicals that come from plants get into our bodies after we consume plant-based materials, it’s digested, the phytonutrients are expressed with the help of the microbiome. They travel throughout our body and they go to cells, and these phytonutrients actually initiate a series of biochemical events in the cell that actually lead directly to genetic influence. And that is big stuff. The phyto nutrients attach to the cells, the cells then respond to the presence of the phyto nutrients, they use that information to send signals to the nucleus, which is where the genes and the DNA of our body resides, and this influence leads to positive health outcomes. The importance of this can’t be overstated. It is a big, big deal.

What is the bottom line? We need to actually consume significant amounts of plant-based material to be able to drive the effect where our genetic potential is expressed through the food that we eat. You’ll learn all about that stuff in the Healthy Transformations program, and we would be very, very happy to help you out. So go to the website, and sign up for one of the workshops, and we’d be happy to help you out.

 

Bugs In Your Gut

Word Count: 635 words Approx. Reading Time: 2.5 – 3 minutes reading time

It may sound like science-fiction to many, but your gut bacteria may have more of an influence than we think. A recent study involving mice and microbiomes shows a link between our gut bacteria and appetite, showing that what we eat today has a future effect on our cravings and hunger tomorrow!

Bugs in our Gut

Our guts are immensely complex systems that contain many species of bacteria; in fact, bacteria genes outnumber human genes by 100 to 1!  Many gut bacteria manufacture special genes called peptides that can regulate and influence hunger. An interesting study shows that people who desire chocolate have a different microbial breakdown, despite eating identical diets. Another study shows that mice raised in a germ-free environment prefer more sweets and have more sweet receptors. While more research is needed, this shows how important the food we choose to consume is to not only our overall health but also our craving and food tastes.

But, Our Brains Too?

Scientists have long known that microbes live inside us. Still, it is only recently that science sees a connection between our mental health and microbiome and the role it plays in diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and autism.

Evidence shows that the bacteria in our stomachs influence our minds, also contributing to depression and isolating feelings. Scientists discovered differences in the amygdala, a region that is responsible for processing social emotions, between mice and germ-free mice. One study shows that mice that were given fecal transplants from depressed humans also became ‘depressed,’ giving up when captured much earlier than the control mice, showing how our gut microbiomes influence our mental state.

Additional studies show that children with autism have different patterns of microbial species in their stool, signifying that there is a link between our stomachs and our minds. As much of the studies have yet to prove cause and effect fully, more research is needed. Still, scientists are confident that bacteria play an essential role in our mental health.

What’s Next for Research

Doctors hope to continue to gain a better understanding of how our microbiomes influence our brains to treat psychiatric and neurological conditions better and clear up some of the misconceptions about the science. More clinical trials are needed to assess the influences guts have on various conditions.

What Can We Do About It?

Understanding how an ecosystem of microbes impact our stomachs and our overall health is an important step in educating ourselves to the importance of diet throughout life. As we are germ-free when we are born, our gut bacteria are influenced by the environment and what we consume. This means that we can change our microbiomes, reducing inflammation and positively influencing our mental health.

What You Can Do to Alter Your Microbiome

Well, studies show that one of the most important factors in reducing disease and improving the gut microbiome is diet. Good thing it is one of the most accessible factors that you can control in your life. Understanding the adverse effects a western diet has on your health and gut is vital to both your physical and mental health. A study of mice shows that after just 12 weeks of a western-style diet made them both obese and diabetic, doubling their weight – only 12 weeks! Their colons were dominated by pro-inflammatory bacteria, and their entire bodies showed signs of inflammation. Do you still want that bowl of Cheetos now?

The Bottom Line

Our guts play a more significant role in our overall health than we had known. With more attention to our diets, we are able to positively change our microbiome. By eating a diet rich in leafy greens, lots of vegetables, and removing packaged and processed foods, your gut will thank you, and it looks like your brain will too

Christopher James Lawrence is a Co-Founder of the Healthy Transformations Program with Dr. Mike Breen.  He is also the Chief Value Officer and Founder of Change My Life Coaching and Co-Founder of Change My Business Coaching — a fast growing whole-life, leadership and business coaching company, and the only one of it’s kind.  He is also the author of “Go Beyond Passion: Discover Your Dream Job”.  Christopher is a Certified Master Coach Practitioner (CMCP), trainer and facilitator, and a passionate public speaker that truly cares about the success of each and every single person he comes into contact with. You can reach him here.

 

The Microbiome and Your Health

Some of you reading will see the title and think “This is going to be interesting”.  Others will see the title and think “What on earth is a microbiome?”

Let’s start with the basics. The microbiome refers to the collection of micro-organisms that travel around with you 24/7/365.  What kind of micro-organisms you might ask?  Well  . . . bacteria, virus, molds, yeasts, parasites.  And, there are a lot of them!  Different interpretations have been made about the number or volume of micro-organisms that reside in or on the body and this is a bit of an academic argument – however it has been postulated by some that an average human body has about 10 trillion cells.  The amazing thing is that the number of micro-organisms are greater by 10 times! Yes, 100 trillion micro-organisms living in us or on us.  Furthermore, these micro-organisms have their own genes, and the total “genetic pool” of these organisms represents 99% of the genes that we carry around.  That is, your own genes represent only 1% of the total genes that are looking at this article.  This astounding information has led some science editorial writers to ask the question, “Who is in charge here?”  Well, the answer may very well be “the bugs”.  The influence that the microbiome has on health and physiology is constantly being re-evaluated – thousands of peer-reviewed articles are published every year on the relationships that exist between “good” microbiota and “good” health, as well as “bad” microbiota and “bad” health. And when I say health, I mean the health of the heart, lungs, gastro-intestinal tract, immune system, skin, and the brain – really, there are not any tissues in the body that are not affected by the collective influence of the microbiome.

These “bugs” inhabit every square centimetre of our skin, but the bulk of the awareness of the microbiota are toward those bugs that exist in our gastro-intestinal tract. (Note:  Some academics in this field refer to the bugs as being the “microbiota” and the gene pool of the bugs being the “microbiome”.  This is correct from a terminology perspective, and yet most people use these terms interchangeably – you may find me going back and forth – for the purpose of this blog, both terms are being used to describe the bugs and not the genes, unless stated).  The bugs in our GI tract perform all kinds of functions – from producing enzymes and vitamins, to aiding in the digestion of food, to being the “gatekeepers” of the intestinal tract, to stimulating the immune system and a host of other functions.  Now, this is when the bugs that exist are “good guys”.  When the bugs that we have are “bad guys” there are a host of bad things that they contribute to including inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, poor digestion, food intolerances, food allergies, autoimmune disease, skin disease, hypersensitivity reactions, and brain disease – particularly mood disorders as well as Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.  The “take-home” message is that the microbiome has a very significant influence on whether we live healthy or sick lives.

Another interesting point is that every single person on earth has a unique microbiome.  The microbiome is as individual as we are. It has been determined that there are in the range of 1000 different species of bacteria that can inhabit the human GI tract, and each one of us houses 200 to 600 of these species.  Even members of your own family have different microbial flora than you.  The science in this field has been moving at an accelerated pace for 10-20 years and yet there is still a great deal to learn.  One of the more recent findings has been in the area of what makes the microbiota function poorly and what makes it thrive.  What has been known for quite a while is that the use of antibiotic medications wreaks havoc on the flora.  Using antibiotics when they are truly necessary is still an important thing – in some cases, lifesaving.  However, the over-utilization of these drugs is a major issue.  Frustratingly, many people are unaware of the volume of antibiotic medication that is used in food production (animals) and ultimately gets into our food supply, ultimately causing issues with our microbiota.  The simple message is that antibiotics are non-discriminatory – they kill the bad bugs that make us sick and they kill the good bugs that keep us healthy.  With the increasing knowledge about the importance of our intestinal bugs, we are starting to seriously question the use of antibiotics in circumstances other than infectious emergencies.  Other chemicals also have negative effects on the GI flora – these include the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, herbicides, pesticides, food preservatives, and the list goes on.

What can we do to preserve or improve the microbiota in our gut?  Certainly the utilization of “probiotics” or good bacteria has been a strategy in place for a few decades.  Recently, there has been some debate in the scientific circles about just how much benefit is derived from the consumption of probiotics.  The uniqueness of our flora suggests that there should not be a “one size fits all” probiotic strategy.  This being said, what, then, is the right probiotic for you? Quite honestly we don’t know. What we do know (or at least what the current consensus is) is that we need to promote diversity of the flora. This can be achieved through probiotics by ensuring that you consume as many different species of bugs as you can. Most notably, this includes the consumption of fermented foods.  The other way to create diversity in your microbiome is to consume large volumes of plant material and as many different types as you can.  You see, the best bugs love to eat plants – so, when we eat plants, they (the bugs) eat plants.  When we eat ice cream, the bugs eat ice cream.  Bottom line is this – we have the capacity to influence our own microbiome and therefore to influence our own health.  The microbiome has remarkable effects on how well (or poorly) our body functions and what we put in our mouths has an enormous influence on what type of microbiome we carry around with us.

Dr. Michael Breen is the co-owner of the Chiropractic Family Care Centre and has been in Private Practice in Calgary, Alberta for over three decades.  Dr. Breen graduated from the University of Calgary Faculty of Kinesiology in 1981 (Honours) and from Palmer College of Chiropractic – West in San Jose, California in 1986.  His foundational clinical work is in the field of Health Optimization.  He uses his background in athletics and chiropractic to aid his patients in recovering physical capacity and uses his background in nutrition and functional medicine to aid his patients in the recovery from chronic illness.  He is the co-founder of the Healthy Transformations program.  Dr. Breen can be reached at mbreendc@telus.net